Like Us On




Payment Processing
Home > Oils and Butters
Our products are crafted with the highest quality natural oils and organic butters.  Your skin will notice - and love the difference!
Sort By:
Page of 1
Sweet Orange Essential Oil
Sweet Orange Essential Oil
Our Price: $4.98

100% Pure. Therapeutic. Bursting with Vitality. Aromatherapy.

Product Description

Therapeutic Grade 100% Pure Orange Oil. Botanical Name: Citrus Sinensis. 15 mL.


Common Name:
Sweet Orange

Latin Name: Citrus sinensis
Other names: orange, China orange, Portugal orange, blood orange
Family: Rutaceae

Source: The outer part of the ripe or almost ripe peel of the fruit is cold expressed and distilled to obtain the essential oil.

Description: Sweet orange essential oil has a sweet, fruity, citrusy and fresh aroma.

Extraction Method: Orange essential oil is obtained by cold expression – a process that involves prodding and pricking the rind. The punctured rind releases the essential oil that is collected and separated from the fruit juice by centrifugal force. Oil collected this way has a higher quality aroma than that of the distilled variety.

Country of origin: USA

History: The orange is a hybrid between pomelo (Citrus maxima) and mandarin (Citrus reticulata). The tree is an evergreen citrus tree native to Asia and sweet oranges were mentioned in Chinese literature in 314 BC. Orange trees are the most cultivated fruit tree in the world. They are widely grown in tropical and subtropical climates for their sweet fruit. The fruit of the orange tree can be eaten fresh, or processed for its juice or fragrant peel. Sweet oranges account for approximately 70% of citrus production worldwide. The tree has glossy green leaves and fragrant white flowers which develop into an edible orange‐colored citrus fruit. It was once common for sailors on ships to fall ill with a disease caused by a deficiency of vitamin C during long voyages. They would sometimes die from this disease, called scurvy. Eating citrus fruits like oranges was found to reverse the effects of the disease.

Constituents: alpha pinene, citronellal, geranial, sabinene, myrcene, limonene, linalool and neral

Types of Use: aromatic, home use, topical with caution, as a supplement only with advice from a healthcare professional

Uses: Orange oil may be used in aromatherapy. Orange oil aroma does not influence the human immune system, but may enhance mood. Diffusing orange essential oil can connect to memory, aid health, and lift mood.

Dilution Guidelines: For aromatic use, add 5‐10 drops of oil per one cup of water. People with dry or sensitive skin may require additional carrier oil when using orange topically. For internal use, consult a certified naturopathic physician. For household/environmental purposes, dilution varies based on intended purpose.

Warnings: Although many citrus oils are phototoxic, sweet orange is not. Sweet orange seems to be safe for most uses with most adults. But in children taking large amounts of sweet orange peel is unsafe. It can cause colic, convulsions, or death. Sweet orange has major interactions with the following drugs: Celiprolol (Celicard), Ivermectin, Pravastatin. Sweet orange can have moderate interactions with antibiotics, Fexofenadine (Allegra), and medications moved by pumps in cells (P‐Glycoprotein substrates).

Phototoxicity warning: No

Shelf Life and Storage Recommendations: Store oils in a cool, dark place and avoid extreme changes in temperature to ensure the longest life for your collection. Cold pressed citrus oils have a high proportion of chemical components that are more prone to oxidization. Take care to store them safely away from heat. You can expect citrus oils to remain in good condition for a year and even longer when cared for properly. Decant large bottles into two smaller bottles to protect one bottle from oxidization for longer periods. Due to their chemical makeup, essential oils do not turn rancid like vegetable oils; they simply degrade gradually into a state where the therapeutic properties become diminished.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug
Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
Information sourced from the Integrated Guide to Essential Oils & Aromatherapy, Second Edition, The
Aromatherapy Encyclopedia by Carol Schiller and David Schiller, WebMD, and other sources.



fair trade organic cocoa butter
Organic Cocoa Butter
Our Price: $5.00

Antioxidant rich cocoa butter is extracted from the cacao bean and carries a rich and pleasant chocolate aroma. Cocoa butter is a natural emollient and stiffening ingredient. This cocoa butter is 100% pure and natural. Size: 4 ounces.
Clove Bud Essential Oil
Clove Bud Essential Oil
Our Price: $5.98

100% Pure. Therapeutic. Bursting with Vitality. Aromatherapy.

Product Description
Clove Bud - Stzygium Aromaticum Essential Oil 15 mL

Common Name: Clove Bud

Latin Name: Syzygium aromaticum
Other names: Clove
Family: Myrtaceae

Source: This essential oil is obtained from the bud of a tropical evergreen tree. The buds yield 16 percent essential oil.

Description: Clove oil has a fresh, sweet, spicy, slightly woody aroma with undertones of citrus.

Extraction Method: Steam distillation is a separation process for temperature-sensitive materials like natural aromatic compounds. Water vapor carries small amounts of the vaporized compounds to a condensation flask, where the condensed liquids separate, allowing for easy collection. This process effectively allows for distillation at lower temperatures, reducing deterioration of the compounds and creating a higher-quality product.

Country of origin: Indonesia

History: Clove was one of the first spices to be traded in human history. Evidence of cloves has been found in vessels dating as far back as 1721 BC. Native to the Malucca (Spice) Islands, clove was one of the most precious spices of the 16th and 17th century, and control of them spurred expeditions and war. In 1522, Magellan's ship returned from its fateful trip around the world with a ship loaded with cloves and nutmeg, worth more than their weight in gold. By the 18th century cloves were being grown in Zanzibar, Madagascar, Brazil, Mauritius, Ternate, Tidore, and Tanzania, among other places.

Constituents: Eugenol, eugenyl acetate, caryophyllene and others.

Types of Use: aromatic, home use, topical when well diluted, as a supplement only with advice from a trained professional

Uses: Clove was used anciently as an antibacterial and antifungal agent. It was used in ancient Persia as a love potion, and by healers in India to treat fevers, respiratory ailments, and digestive problems. The bark, leaf, and roots of the clove tree have been used to increase lactation in nursing mothers, although this is not now a recommended use. It is used by dentists to relieve toothaches. Clove is listed as the food with the highest antioxidant content. The essential oil is said to work for two hours to repel mosquitoes and is said to improve digestion, relieve excess gas, uplift the mood, help with mental clarity, and reduce pain by numbing.

Dilution Guidelines: For aromatic use, add 5-10 drops of oil per one cup of water. If using topically, dilute with carrier oil. For household/environmental purposes dilution varies based on intended purpose. Take internally only with advice from a trained professional.

Warnings: Clove oil is possibly safe when applied to the skin. However, frequent and repeated application of clove oil in the mouth or on the gums can sometimes cause damage to the gums, tooth pulp, skin, and mucous membranes. In children, clove oil is likely unsafe to take by mouth. It can cause severe side effects such as seizures, liver damage, and fluid imbalances. Avoid use during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Clove oil contains a chemical called eugenol that seems to slow blood clotting. There is a concern that taking clove oil might cause bleeding in people with bleeding disorders. Stop using clove at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery. Clove interacts with some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), and others.

Blood Clotting warning: Yes

Shelf Life and Storage Recommendations: Store oils in a cool, dark place and avoid extreme changes in temperature to ensure the longest life for your collection. You can expect this oil to remain in good condition for four years and even longer when cared for properly. Decant large bottles into smaller bottles to protect one bottle from oxidization for longer periods. Due to their chemical makeup, essential oils do not turn rancid like vegetable oils; they degrade gradually into a state where the therapeutic properties become diminished.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information sourced from the Integrated Guide to Essential Oils & Aromatherapy, Second Edition, The Aromatherapy Encyclopedia by Carol Schiller and David Schiller, WebMD.com and other sources.

Peppermint Essential Oil
Peppermint Essential Oil
Our Price: $6.98

100% Pure. Therapeutic. Bursting with Vitality. Aromatherapy.

Product Description
Therapeutic Grade 100% Pure Peppermint Oil. Botanical Name: Mentha Piperita. 15 mL

Common Name: Peppermint

Latin Name: Mentha piperita
Other names: brandy mint, balm mint
Family: Lamiaceae

Source: This oil is sourced from the fresh leaves of the herb.

Description: Peppermint is a hybrid mint, a cross between watermint and spearmint. The plant, indigenous to Europe and the Middle East, is now widespread in cultivation in many regions of the world. The smell of peppermint is sharp, sweet, and mentholated.

Extraction Method: Steam distillation is a separation process for temperature­sensitive materials like natural aromatic compounds. Water vapor carries small amounts of the vaporized compounds to a condensation flask, where the condensed liquids separate, allowing for easy collection. This process effectively allows for distillation at lower temperatures, reducing deterioration of the compounds and creating a higher­quality product.

Country of origin: India

History: Ancient Egyptians used peppermint ­­ dried peppermint leaves were discovered in pyramids that have been carbon dated to 1,000 BC. The Romans grew mint and peppermint in their gardens for its medicinal purposes, especially as a digestive aid. They also used mint and peppermint as a ground cover, especially between stepping stone pathways. Essence of Peppermint was patented in 1762 by John Juniper and became one of several 18th century English patent medicines to continue in production into the 20th century. Constituents: Menthol, menthone, menthyl acetate, menthofuran, limonene, pulegone, cineol, and others.

Types of Use: aromatic, home use, topical when well diluted, as a supplement only with advice from a trained professional

Uses: Peppermint has been used to help Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), with motion sickness, indigestion, nausea, sore throat, diarrhea, headaches, toothaches, and cramps. It can be used to deaden pain, to relieve itching, for temporary relief of headaches, to help with organ function, to calm pain from shingles, neuralgia and sciatica, as a cooling agent, and to cool a fever. It can be used as a mood enhancer, for nausea, to stay alert, to heal a cold sore, for painful menstruation, and to help energize.

Dilution Guidelines: For aromatic use, add 5­10 drops of oil per one cup of water. If using topically, dilute well with carrier oil. For household/environmental purposes dilution varies based on intended
purpose. Take internally only with advice from a trained professional.

Warnings: Peppermint oil is likely safe when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts or when applied to the skin. The leaf is possibly safe when taken in amounts used for medicine short­term (up to 8 weeks). The safety of using peppermint leaf long­term is unknown.Peppermint can cause some side effects including heartburn and allergic reactions including flushing, headache, and mouth sores.Peppermint oil, when taken by mouth in pills with a special (enteric) coating to prevent contact with the stomach, is possibly safe for children 8 years of age and older. Not enough is known about the safety of taking larger amounts if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Enteric­coated peppermint oil could cause anal burning, if you have diarrhea. Shelf Life and Storage Recommendations: Store oils in a cool, dark place and avoid extreme changes in temperature to ensure the longest life for your collection. You can expect this oil to remain in good condition for four years and even longer when cared for properly. Decant large bottles into smaller bottles to protect one bottle from oxidization for longer periods. Due to their chemical makeup, essential oils do not turn rancid like vegetable oils; they degrade gradually into a state where the therapeutic properties become diminished.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information sourced from the Integrated Guide to Essential Oils & Aromatherapy, Second Edition, The Aromatherapy Encyclopedia by Carol Schiller and David Schiller, WebMD.com and other sources.


sweet almond oil
Sweet Almond Oil
Our Price: $10.00

Delicately scented, rich in protein and Vitamin E; sweet almond oil is great for
moisturizing and softening skin. Sweet almond oil is used as a main ingredient in our soap
formulations in order to produce a gentlesoap with good, mild lather.
Lavender Essential Oil
Lavender Essential Oil
Our Price: $10.98

100% Pure. Therapeutic. Bursting with Vitality. Aromatherapy.

Product Description
Therapeutic Grade 100% Pure Lavender Oil. Botanical Name: Lavandula Angustifolia. 15 mL

fair trade organic vegan certified shea butter
Organic Shea Butter
Our Price: $12.00

This large, half pound tub organic and vegan certified shea butter, also known as African Karite butter, is tenderly extracted from the nuts of trees is West Africa, manually hand pressed and kept at low temperatures to naturally preserve it. Great for skin and hair, shea butter is useful for moisturizing and healing damaged skin. Shea butter is smooth and creamy and melts to the slightest touch. When used in soap, shea butter adds a luxurious and silky feel!
pure coconut oil
Pure Coconut Oil
Our Price: $12.00

This is large half pound tub of pure refined, cold pressed 76 degree coconut oil is a wonderful lathering and hardening ingredient, best when used with a combination of oils in soap making.